Asbestos In the Workplace

Hello everyone. I would like to take this chance to send out my sincere thank you to Mr. Mike Postorino who is the National 0Awareness Director for the Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com

Mike has been kind enough to supply us with the following article about Asbestos. When it comes to safety I believe that this is a topic everyone needs to know about.

So here is the article....

The Use Of Asbestos In Occupational Settings

The use of asbestos in occupational settings can be detrimental to the health of industrial workers and their families. Despite the numerous functional benefits that asbestos provides, it comes with a hefty price tag to human health.

Asbestos has been linked to the development of various cancers like mesothelioma and lung cancer, in addition to diseases like asbestosis and pleural plaques. This occurs when the mineral's fibers get inhaled or ingested in to the body and gradually damage cells and DNA. Estimates for the number of annual deaths from asbestos-related diseases are as high as 10,000 in the United States.

Forming naturally, asbestos is used for its heat-resistant properties in products like insulation materials, piping, plumbing, electrical wiring and even household products like hairdryers and ironing boards. Manufacturers have integrated it into thousands of products, endangering the people who make the product as well as the end users.

Occupational use of asbestos was extremely common during much of the 20th century. Companies considered the substance as a cost-effective and durable material that could be exploited for as many industrial purposes as possible. Unfortunately, its consequences to human health were not considered.

Workers from more than 75 different occupational groups have been exposed to asbestos, according to data from the National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety. These occupational groups include construction workers, miners, insulators, blacksmiths, auto mechanics, railroad workers, carpenters, custodians, pipefitters, shipyard workers and metal workers, to name a few.

Daily interactions with asbestos fibers dramatically increase the risk of developing an asbestos-related disease. Improper handling or processing of products that contain this mineral will likely cause the fibers to become airborne and eventually inhaled or ingested. Researchers have not conclusively determined why some workers develop mesothelioma or similar diseases while their coworkers don't, but genetics and lifestyle choices are suspected to play a role.

Another group that has also been harmed by asbestos includes the families of people who work in these hazardous occupations. When asbestos fibers become airborne, they often get stuck on the hair, skin, clothing and equipment of a worker. When he or she arrives at home, his asbestos-laden body, clothing and equipment then exposes unsuspecting family members.

This process, known as secondary exposure, has accounted for many asbestos-related deaths. Wives have specifically been impacted by this exposure. Because dirty clothing needs cleaning, spouses who clean their husbands' asbestos-filled clothing on a regular basis are directly exposed to the same hazardous substances and eventually inhale or ingest much of it. The impact to their health is as if they were working in the same occupational settings as their spouse.

Workers or their family members who have or think they had asbestos exposure should consider getting regular screening by medical specialists. Early detection of asbestos-related diseases is the key to having the best treatment options available to improve prognosis.

Be Sure To Share This Article With Your Friends

Again I would like to thank Mike and the people from Asbestos.com for this great article.

One of the things that I have added to our website is the facebook like and send button at the top of the page.

So you can share this great article with your friends and family just by clicking on the send button at the top of the page.

Or you can use the buttons below.After reading this article you will see that Asbestos could not only harm you but other family members as well.

Mesothelioma Help

I would also like to thank Chelsea Montanaro for introducing me to a great site that helps mesothelioma victims get assistance from asbestos funds.

Mesothelioma Fund.com web site not only helps covers victim funding information but it is also a great resource for information on treatment, and also has a free mesothelioma packet along with Live Chat support.


They have all the information that you will need to get any questions answered so be sure to check out their web site

Who is at risk ?

Are you at risk? At work this is one of the things that everyone should be aware of fortunately there is a great website that offers a free guide to answer any questions that you may have. 

Kaila Williams from Asbestos.net has been kind enough to send me the link to their website to share with you. After reviewing their website I knew it had to be included as a resource to help get this information out to everyone. 

This site not only tell you who may be at risk but it also gives you information on the treatments of Mesothelioma and the top doctors who specialize for the treatment for this disease.

Be Sure To Check This  Out

Here is another great site that Deborah Slaughter sent us to share with everyone- Mesothelioma.net

The more information that we can get out to help people with this disease. Be sure that you check out this site and the Survivor Blog at the bottom of the page.


Remember to spread the word.



Do You Need Legal Advice?

When it comes to Mesothelioma you always need to get the right advice not only from doctors but also from a lawyer who is used to dealing with Asbestos cases.


Well I would like to thank Susan Kolb with the Mesothelioma Lawyer Centre for getting a hold of me and introducing me to thier web site.

http://www.mesotheliomalawyercenter.org

With over 20 years of helping families connect with lawyers this is definetly a good web site for you to check out





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